Some great distracted-driving awareness exposure...

I got a piece up in the Washington Post last week. Here's an excerpt:

"Finally, in July 2013, I saw it. I was at Good Housekeeping, editing a story about a man who had lost his daughter in a crash. Casey Feldman, 21, an aspiring journalist at Fordham University, was walking home from a summer job in Ocean City, N.J., when a delivery van driver became distracted, ran a stop sign and killed her. Her father learned afterward that the driver had been holding some iced tea and reaching for a GPS device at the same time. 

"In his grief, Joel Feldman thought about his daughter’s interest in journalism. She had believed that telling stories made a difference. So Joel started a nonprofit, End Distracted Driving, in Casey’s honor and began telling her story in schools.

"Alarms went off in my head as I read the story. My father had also died because of a distracted driver."

Safer Roads Start With You

(This is the fourth in a month-long series of guest blog posts from National Safety Council survivor advocates. We are sharing our stories in honor of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month.) 

Car crashes are the number one killer of teens in America. Over 2,500 teens died in motor vehicle crashes in 2013, and more than 300,000 were involved in crashes that sent them to the emergency room, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 

I myself will be taking to the roads soon as a teen driver, and I don’t find these statistics encouraging.

I’ve also lost a loved one because of a distracted driver. My nana was killed by someone who chose to drive and text.

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Hope for the Human Spirit

(This is the second in a month-long series of guest blog posts from National Safety Council survivor advocates. We are sharing our stories in honor of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month.) 

Hope is the biggest takeaway from spending time with these strong and selfless advocates. How much easier it would be to just stay frozen in grief and pain. To be moved to action, so others won’t have to go through this type of sorrow and loss, brings hope to the human spirit that was damaged by the act of distracted driving. Sharing information to help create change, speaking up at a legislative hearing, meeting with community leaders to encourage company policies for employees not to use devices while driving, all of these things bring hope to this issue. We don’t have to let this trend continue. We hope you will be moved to focus on your drive and not wait until you are directly affected by distracted driving like we were. Remove the distractions from your ride. We are here to tell you, it can happen to you.

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